How To Add A Second Router To A Network?

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This article discusses how to link two routers to create a home network that can support more wireless devices, have a larger coverage area, and act as an access point or switch.

If you have trouble with wireless network connections at your home or business, you might wish to add a router to increase the network’s coverage area.

The range of your wireless network can be increased by adding a router. You’re undoubtedly aware of where your home’s Wi-Fi is now unavailable. You should receive complete coverage if you place the second router in those locations.

Although adding a second router to your Wi-Fi is generally not difficult, there are still a few things you should be aware of. This page provides a thorough explanation of each technique as well as advice on the best tools to use.

Before Start

The range of a Wi-Fi router relies on the standards it may use. For instance, compared to Wireless-G routers, Wireless N routers (802.11n) have a greater range.

Although using two 802.11n routers is recommended, using a Wireless-G router as the second router can also be acceptable. If you configure a wireless connection, ensure you are aware of the passkey and SSID for each router.

The second router’s placement is crucial as well. You can place it in your home’s blackout area after configuring it adjacent to the computer.

Different Router Connection Methods

There are two ways to link routers: LAN to LAN or LAN to WAN. Although you create a LAN to WAN connection similarly, it functions differently. A LAN to LAN connection includes connecting two routers via Ethernet wire.

Put a second router in place.

Adding a second router makes sense in a few circumstances, even though most home computer networks only utilize one router. An additional router enhances a wired network to accommodate more wireless devices. It increases a home network’s wireless range to connect wired devices that are too far from the original router or reach dead spots.

A second router sets up a distinct subnetwork to broadcast video among some devices in a home without slowing down connections to others. There are only a few steps needed to make it all work.

Place a Windows PC or another computer you may use for initial configuration close to the new router when you set it up. The best way to configure a wired or wireless router is from a computer linked to the router by an Ethernet network cable. The router can later be relocated to its final location.

Add Another Wired Router

You must use an Ethernet cable to connect the second router to the first router if it lacks wireless capabilities. Connect the cable’s other end to the uplink port on the new router (sometimes labeled WAN or Internet). The second end should be plugged into any available port on the first router besides the uplink port.

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Similar to how wired routers are connected, home wireless routers can be connected using an Ethernet cable. It is also feasible to link two home routers together wirelessly; however, in most setups, the second router can only serve as a wireless access point, not a router.

To use the second router’s full routing capabilities, you must configure it in client mode, which is supported by a few home routers. To find out if a certain router model supports client mode and, if so, how to setup it up, see the documentation for that router model.

Setting Wi-Fi Channels on Wireless Home Routers

If the second router and the old router are wireless, their Wi-Fi signals may clash, resulting in dropped connections and erratic network slowdowns. Signal interference happens when two wireless routers in the same home use the same or overlapping Wi-Fi frequency ranges, known as channels.

Depending on the model, wireless routers typically use a different Wi-Fi channel, but you can modify these settings in the router panel. Set the first router in residence to channel 1 or 6 and the second to channel 11 to prevent signal interference between the two routers.

Configuring a Second Router’s IP Address

Home network routers also have a default IP address option depending on the model. A second router’s default IP settings are fine to leave alone unless you want to use it as a network switch or access point.

Setting Up a Second Router

If you have trouble with wireless network connections at your home or business, you might wish to add a router to increase the network’s coverage area.

How to Expand Your Wireless Network by Adding a Second Router?

The range of your wireless network can be increased by adding a router. You’re undoubtedly aware of where your home’s Wi-Fi is now unavailable. You should receive complete coverage if you place the second router in those locations.

Although adding a second router to your Wi-Fi is generally not difficult, there are still a few things you should be aware of. This page provides a thorough explanation of each technique as well as advice on the best tools to use.

1. Is Your Equipment Compatible at All?

Before moving forward, you should confirm if setting up the second router wirelessly is even feasible with your current setup.

Not all wireless routers can be used to build their network inside the network of the primary router, but the majority of them can be utilized as a wireless access point or range extender.

A “bridge” or “repeater” mode is required on your secondary router.

If unsure, see the router’s instruction manual or the manufacturer’s website.

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2. Joining the Main Router

You must complete the initial configuration on the main router if you haven’t previously. If you have an Ethernet cable, ensure the router is initially linked to your modem before connecting a different Ethernet wire from your computer to the router.

You might need to buy an Ethernet to USB adapter if your Windows PC or Mac no longer has an Ethernet port to establish a wired connection.

3. Accessing the Main Router

This primary router should be configured as if it were the only router in the house because it will manage the modem-based Internet connection.

You’ll need to log in after typing the router’s IP address into the URL bar of your web browser to access the web interface.

The router will frequently ship with a card giving the login and password to access it unless you have previously changed them, which is advised for security reasons.

Remember that each router’s settings can vary greatly based on the maker and model. You should go to the router’s manual or the support section of the manufacturer’s website if you ever have trouble locating a certain setting.

You can log out of the router and disconnect once the first configuration is complete because we won’t need to reconnect to the primary.

4. Accessing the Secondary Router

It is time to use an Ethernet wire to connect the second router to your computer, log in, and access the settings page.

You must navigate to a configuration page called “Internet” or “Wireless.”

If you have a separate modem, the router does not now need to be connected to it.

5. Switch on Bridge Mode

You are looking for “Network Mode” under “Connection Type” or “Wireless Mode” on the configuration page.

Depending on the model of your router, choose “Bridge Mode” or “Repeater Mode” (both mean the same thing).

If you don’t see this choice, your router probably doesn’t support bridging; in that case, you’ll either need to buy another router that does or link the two routers using Ethernet, as previously explained.

6. Set the IP address of the second router.

It is necessary to configure the second router’s IP address to be in its DHCP range.

You will need to adjust the second router’s IP address to be anything in between, for instance, if the first router’s DHCP range is 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.50.

Ensure the subnet mask matches the primary router’s when configuring the IP address.

7. Assign a special name to the second router.

Giving the second router a distinctive name will clarify which router you are connecting to when adding your devices to the network. Thus, it is advised that you do so.

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It doesn’t matter what name you choose for either router; it only depends on where they are located in your home.

Ensure that WPA2 is selected on both routers, which should be the case by default.

For simplicity of use, you might also want to ensure that both are set to use the same password. Just be sure to choose a strong password that is difficult to guess to prevent unwanted access.

8. Place the Second Router in the Proper Position

Now that the second router has been configured, you may put it where you want it to repeat the first router’s signal throughout your house.

The second router should be positioned to receive at least 50% of the signal intensity from the primary router. The higher the signal intensity, the better for maintaining a strong connection between the routers.

The second router should receive the strongest signal if there is a direct line of sight between them, as opposed to obstructions like walls.

What Advantages Do Two Routers on the Same Network Offer?

There are several advantages to setting up a dual-router home network, including:

Increased wired device connectivity: It’s possible that your primary router only has a finite number of LAN ports accessible for wired device connections (five if you are lucky). Without the requirement for a network switch, more devices can immediately have wired connectivity by adding the router’s Ethernet ports.

Better support for mixed wired/wireless setups: If you have a wired home network but also want to connect certain Wi-Fi-capable devices, having a second router is helpful. The routers can be divided so that all wireless devices connect to the secondary router while the wired devices continue to connect to the primary router. This is especially beneficial if the wired devices are placed on the opposite side of the house from the wireless ones.

Isolation for specific devices: Dual routers can be set up to isolate specific devices and stop a high quantity of network traffic from harming the other devices in your home if certain devices are used by the network connection particularly frequently. For instance, you might want to consider separating a specific PC from a smart TV that is streaming television if the PC routinely transfers huge files or engages in intense online gaming.

Better wireless coverage: By simply using a second router to extend an existing Wi-Fi connection, you can significantly increase the coverage in your home and give even those remote devices a steady wireless connection.

Backup device: Having a functional backup router on hand in case your primary router breaks unexpectedly is a good idea.

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